Posts Tagged ‘Sallie Lee’

Lunch and Learn: The Buzz on Pollinators

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Lunch and Learn: The Buzz on Pollinators

On Wednesday, August 6, Sallie Lee of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System led an installment in the Lunch and Learn series. Lee shared how to welcome bee pollinators in colorful and exciting ways into home gardens.

The Lunch and Learn events are FREE. Our next event will be held on Wednesday, August 13 from 11:30 – 12:30 p.m. Titled “Porous, Permeable and Pervious,” the event will be led by Director of Horticulture James Horton. Bring your lunch and we’ll provide the drinks and desserts!

Volunteers honored at annual Birmingham Botanical Gardens luncheon

Monday, December 17th, 2012

 

(L to R: Director of Library Services Hope Long, Cathy Adams, Volunteer Coordinator Taylor Steele)

Volunteers honored at annual Birmingham Botanical Gardens luncheon

On Thursday, December 13, Birmingham Botanical Gardens held its annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon, recognizing the time donated by those that assist in the achievement of The Gardens’ educational mission. Cathy Adams was presented the Ida C. Burns Volunteer of the Year award for her continual service in many areas of the organization and her significant impact on The Gardens. Ann Katholi was awarded the A. Brand Walton, Jr. Unsung Hero of the Year for her independent and “behind the scenes” contributions. Birmingham Audubon Society was recognized as the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Partner of the Year for helping The Gardens to multiply its effort and achieve its mission. Betsy Fleenor was awarded the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Plantperson of the Year for sharing her plant knowledge and skills with other individuals who volunteer. Sallie Lee was awarded Educator of the Year for her educational efforts promoting public knowledge and appreciation of plants, gardens and the environment.

The potluck luncheon was held in Strange Auditorium from 11:30 – 1 p.m. Music was provided by the Crestwood Trio.

(L to R: Betsy Fleenor, Ann Katholi, Sallie Lee, Ty Keith, Helena Uber-Wamble (Keith and Uber-Wamble are with Birmingham Audubon Society))

Upcoming Volunteer Training Sessions at The Gardens

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Birmingham Botanical Gardens has two terrific opportunities this month, allowing interested volunteers a chance to learn more about getting involved with The Gardens.

James Horton and Sallie Lee have agreed to facilitate volunteer “brown bag” training classes for greenhouse volunteers and plant groups that utilize the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Greenhouse

 Both classes will be held in the Lower-level Conference Room and the BBG Greenhouse respectively.

  • Greenhouse Maintenance and Plant Propagation

 James Horton, Director of Horticulture Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Date & Time: Wednesday, February 22nd 12:30 pm-2:30 pm

Location: Lower-level Conference Room, BBG Greenhouse

Class Size: 30 participants maximum

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  • Integrated Pest Management (IPM), Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Sallie Lee, Urban Regional Extension Agent

Date & Time: Wednesday, February 29th 12:30 pm-2:30 pm

Location: Lower-level Conference Room, BBG Greenhouse

Class Size: 30 participants maximum

For more information about how you can become a volunteer at The Gardens, we encourage you to contact Volunteer Coordinator Taylor Steele at 205.414.3962 or by email at tsteele@bbgardens.org.

Certificate in Native Plant Studies

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

Sample of Previous Classes offered in Certificate in Native Plant Studies

- Introduction to the Study of Native Plants (core)

- Non-Native Invasive Plants Workshop (elective)

- Native Woody Plants in Summer (elective)

- Introduction to Botany (core)

- Native Ferns and Their Relatives (elective)

- Introduction to Soil Science (elective)

- Introduction to Plant Taxonomy/Plant Classification (core)

- Native Plants for Pollinators (elective)

- Medicinal and Edible Plants (elective)

- Ecology of Alabama Native Plants (core)

- Nighttime on the Cahaba – by Canoe! (field trip): What better way to escape the heat of summer than participating in a leisurely moonlight paddle on the Cahaba River? This unique and relaxing way of enjoying a flat water portion of the Cahaba River will allow us to experience the Cahaba in a different light; we will see some familiar plants not normally viewed at night, as well as see and hear a variety of wildlife (imagine: beaver tails slapping water and the calls of night birds.), including hundreds of glowing firefly larvae. (The majority of proceeds will benefit the Cahaba River Society.) 

- Bats and Plants (field trip): After visiting some distinctive botanical sites en route to our destination, we will gather at the 264 acre Sauta Cave National Wildlife Refuge, whose cave is home to federally endangered gray and Indiana bats. After a briefing on bats – we will witness what may be the most significant evening bat flights in the Southeast. Recent estimates of bats emerging were 300,000-400,000! After viewing this spectacle, we hope to conclude the evening by observing a resident colony of glow worms. Participants are invited to bring a picnic dinner to enjoy on the cave’s observation just before dark.

- Movable Plants: Creating Beautiful Container Gardens with Native Plants: Gardening in various types of containers can offer many advantages, especially for those who live in apartments, condominiums, or for those who don’t have space to garden in the ground. Gardening in movable vessels also enables one to use containers as accents in varied locations. This class will show you how to plant a variety of themed containers: for sun, shade, bog, winter, butterflies, hummingbirds and other forms of wildlife. Lists of recommended plants for each type of planting will be distributed.

- Spring Identification of Native Woody Plants (elective): Using The Gardens’ extensive living collections as a hands-on resource, we will focus on attributes and identification features of species found naturally or in cultivation in Alabama. Attendees will examine and learn to identify ~20 plants whose key traits are evident in spring, as well as learn which of these plants make good sense to use in your landscapes. This is largely a walking class, held outdoors; please dress appropriately for the weather.

- What’s That Plant? A Workshop for Learning How to Identify Plants (elective): Identifying plants can be challenging and perplexing, but is an important skill to possess. This full-day workshop will begin at a very basic level and progress to the use of more complex methods and tools used for learning a plant’s identity. Basic terminology will be presented, followed by instruction on the use of a variety of tools, primarily taxonomic keys used as “roadmaps” that lead to plant identification. Ample time will be spent doing hands-on exercises and corroborating material learned while examining plants in The Gardens. Recommended reference:  Plant Identification Terminology: An Illustrated Glossary, by James G. Harris and Melinda Woolf Harris (Jan 1, 2001)

- Summer Identification of Native Woody Plants (elective): Using The Gardens’ extensive living collections as a hands-on resource, we will focus on attributes and identification features of species found naturally or in cultivation in Alabama. Attendees will examine and learn to identify ~20 plants whose key traits are evident in summer, as well as learn which of these plants make good sense to use in your landscapes. This is largely a walking class, held outdoors; please dress appropriately for the weather.

- The Fascinating World of Carnivorous Plants (elective): The southeastern United States is a hotspot of diversity for carnivorous plants, which obtain their nutrients by attracting, capturing, and digesting living animals. They inhabit some of our most unique and imperiled wetland habitats. This course will examine their life history and explore some of the plant communities that support them. Our instructor will cover the identification, cultivation, and propagation of several species of carnivorous plants. He will also profile conservation efforts being taken to conserve many of these species, as well as their endangered and species-rich habitats. In addition to visiting the bog in the Kaul Wildflower Garden, each participant will have the opportunity to create a “bog in a bowl” to take home.